The Deep Glories of Our Faith: Psalm 112:4-6

4 “Light dawns in the darkness for the upright;
    he is gracious, merciful, and righteous.
It is well with the man who deals generously and lends;
    who conducts his affairs with justice.
For the righteous will never be moved;
     he will be remembered forever.”

Psalm 112:4-6, ESV

We all I suppose, want life to come and show us something. We all have expectations and we imagine that life will eventually come around, and bring us what we want.

This psalm seems to insist that we should accept, rather than demand. There is a certain deceit that declares we should insist on certain things. (And yet there are very few that have ever done this.)  And yet, we see that our humility in this, is almost compromised into this triumphalism. We are no longer “broken” but fortified by our certainty.

Commentary

V. 4, Light dawns in the darkness for the upright;
    he is gracious, merciful, and righteous.”

Light almost always is coveted. We definitely consider light to be a superior state. This verse seems to be  a understanding of a process where the believer will anticipate fluidity, a change. But those who connect to evil, are never ever given any sort of advancement. They are locked into a strange sort of stasis, they will never advance out-of-it. (This is scary, when you really think about it.)

We should anticipate the ‘light’ that comes. We’ve endured a long hard night, and we are suddenly surprised by the sunrise. And this can only really happen because of the heart of God.  “He is gracious, merciful, and righteous.”

And because He is like this, we can latch onto an aspect of God’s nature that is seldom ever seen. And because He has shown us these things, upon arrival, we are in a completely different state.

V. 5, “It is well with the man who deals generously and lends;
    who conducts his affairs with justice.”

Admittedly, there is “kind of Old Testament sense” here. But if we insist, the glasses of Grace will change all we see.  These “glasses” tell us that there is something beyond legalism. We will never find our Father, by the efforts of our will.

And yet, a definite kind of goodness meets us when our hearts are generous and kind. When we are a blessing to others, we suddenly realize that we’ve been blessed through our own kindness. It’s a bit ironic, isn’t it? (I would never have sorted this out on my own.)

V. 6, “For the righteous will never be moved;
     he will be remembered forever.”

Becoming right with God, on every level, brings us stability. This means, “stability” and a definite immobility. We are latched on to something good, and we dare not let this go. I’ve been told that huge whales and sharks seem to acquire a small “sucker-fish” that attaches itself on its much bigger host. These little fish will “clean”  their hosts. But then they are given a deep protection.

“Never be moved,” is a tremendous place to be. There is a solid state of certain publicity that is given. We can only receive all that we’ve been forgiven. We must work through these issues. This is all  we need to arrive at a place that is extraordinary. All I can say, is the fact that God’s grace is quite exceptional.

bry-signat (1)

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Lightning Rods: Psalm 34:19-22

lightning-1 19 The righteous person faces many troubles, but the Lord comes to the rescue each time. 20 For the Lord protects the bones of the righteous; not one of them is broken!

21 Calamity will surely overtake the wicked, and those who hate the righteous will be punished. 22 But the Lord will redeem those who serve him. No one who takes refuge in him will be condemned.

Psalm 34:19-22

“How frail is humanity! How short is life, how full of trouble!”

Job 14:1

“If you will call your troubles experiences, and remember that every experience develops some latent force within you, you will grow vigorous and happy, however adverse your circumstances may seem to be.”

John Heywood, (English Playwright and Poet, 1497-1580)

The conclusion of this psalm is a description of the believer’s troubles. I daresay there is as much tribulation and trial in the Bible as the subjects of grace and love. We will find a freedom in the Lord once we stumble upon this realization. It seems I am always in “hot water,” but it keeps me clean! “I have told you all this so that you may have peace in me. Here on earth you will have many trials and sorrows. But take heart, because I have overcome the world.” 

John 16:33

Commentary

V. 19, The righteous person faces many troubles, but the Lord comes to the rescue each time.”

To deny that there are difficulties for the believer is silly. We seem to generate new ones on a daily basis. This is God’s work bench. And He seems to be quite comfortable with this arrangement. Only He calls them “trials.” We shouldn’t think we will eventually mature and attain some powerful wisdom. (I wish this was so.) Maturity is not the absence of issues, but the result of going through them.

The Lord is into “search and rescue.” The rescue part is great! Each of His children have this knack (or grace) in their lives. This is the doctrine of “the perseverance of the saints.” God is active and in every situation He brings deliverance and extrication.

V. 20, “For the Lord protects the bones of the righteous; not one of them is broken!”

In the Midwest, almost every home and barn has at least one lightning rod. I have seen three or four on bigger barns. Since there are so many thunderstorms, people have to protect their homes from strikes. You haven’t lived until you have seen lightning hit these rods.

We are much like this. We seem to attract all kinds of things. We are afflicted, but we have hope. Nothing can remain broken.

“He comforts us in all our troubles so that we can comfort others. When they are troubled, we will be able to give them the same comfort God has given us.”

2 Corinthians 1:4

V. 21, “Calamity will surely overtake the wicked, and those who hate the righteous will be punished.”

This awesome dynamic only works for believers. For those still separated from God, we should only expect trials to hurt and break. The unbeliever can only expect his/her trials to harm and injure. It is a sad thing to watch, but there are so many who are in pain. “The wages of sin is death.” I’m glad I’m no longer on that particular payroll.

V. 22, “ But the Lord will redeem those who serve him. No one who takes refuge in him will be condemned.”

Redeem and Refuge. Both words require some interesting initiative on our part as believers. The ‘redeem’ phrase puts out the idea of service. When we set our live to be His servants He runs out to meet us (a.k.a. “the Prodigal Son” in Luke 15.)

The ‘refuge’ phrase works off the idea of the cities of Refuge in the O.T. Someone guilty could flee to them for safety. What was literal in the O.T. is a figurative (or spiritual) in the N.T. We have committed sins, indecencies, and rebellious acts. But there is a rescuer, a redeemer most gentle and kind.

ybic, Bryan